EBOOK The Violin Maker: Finding a Centuries–Old Tradition in a Brooklyn Workshop BY John Marchese – dugisits.co.za

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The Violin Maker: Finding a Centuries-Old Tradition in a Brooklyn Workshop

The Violin Maker: Finding a Centuries-Old Tradition in a Brooklyn Workshop Characters ´ 102 World Stops on the itinerary include Cremona Italy the magical city where Antonio Stradivari and a few of his contemporaries achieved a level of violin–making perfection that has endured for centuries as well as points in France and Germany integral to the history of the violinA stunning work of narrative nonfiction that's also a finely crafted loving homage to the instrument that most closely approximates the human voice. Beautiful story and well done

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The Violin Maker: Finding a Centuries-Old Tradition in a Brooklyn Workshop Characters ´ 102 How does a simple piece of wood become a violin the king of instruments Watch and find out as Eugene Drucker a member of the world–renowned Emerson String uartet commissions Sam Zygmuntowicz a Brooklyn craftsman to make him a new violin As he tells this extraordinary story journalist John Marchese shares the rich lore of this beloved instrument and illuminates an art that has barely changed since the RenaissanceMarchese ta. Since Stradivarius and Guarneri died in the early 18th Century the world has been frustrated I wish Strad had left us a little book or something He didn t and John Marchese whose avocation is jazz trumpet does what dozens have done before him try to find the secret He describes with amusement some uack violin builders luthiers claims to have learned the mystery of Strad or to have uncovered a long buried notebook But no such thing exists and no one knows why not too long after the instrument was invented three or four craftsman in Cremona Italy in the late 17th early 18th Century produced the best violins cellos too ever madeOf course violin making didn t end in 1750 But this book isn t just about research and the obligatory trip to the Po Valley Rather the author follows the making of a modern violin based on older models for Gene Drucker a member of the former Emerson uartet This is a new approach and Brooklyn s Sam Zygmuntowicz is the top of that trade It s an interesting gambit but ultimately unsuccessful Readers will learn about string instrument construction Yet for one thing Sam and others admit most of a luthier s work is ordinary carpentry All we really do is make boxes The thing is they re magical boxes And that s the second problem sound isn t just indescribable it s personal The finest Strads and Guarneis are worth up to about 5 million Sam charges under 100000 for an instrument that attempts to combine the best features of those 250 year old boxes And modern violins aren t so prone to abrupt changes in tone corresponding to heat and humidity picture for example successive concerts in Helsinki and Houston Tremendous advantages in theoryThe other three members of the Emerson uartet like Sam s creations better than their prior instrument though none previously were playing a Strad They also liked the new one created for Drucker No professional musician could tell the difference between Drucker s Strad and his new instrument in concert or recording Drucker used both when the uartet overdubbed itself to record Mendelssohn s Octet But what matters is what a violinist hears beneath his ear Sound is so personal that the writing is incidental to the idiosyncratic decisions of the player There s a little but not much of a book in that

Review à PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free Ï John Marchese

The Violin Maker: Finding a Centuries-Old Tradition in a Brooklyn Workshop Characters ´ 102 Kes readers from start to finish as Zygmuntowicz builds the violin from the first selection of the wood to the cutting of the back and belly through the carving of the scroll and the fingerboard to the placement of the sound peg Though much of the story takes place in the craftsman's museum–like Brooklyn workshop there are side trips across the river to the rehearsal rooms of Carnegie Hall and Lincoln center and across the. I d recently read Clapton s Guitar Allen St John Free Press and I later read a mention of John Marchese s The Violin Maker in an online discussion of luthierie The notion of Old WorldNew World kinship intrigued me so I bought the book poured some wine and settled in with my hopes high Reading The Violin Maker was as pleasant a journey as I ve made through a book To my mind there is enough technical enlightenment materials and techniues enough history a visit to Cremona Italy the home of Stradavari Amati and Guarneri and enough character study the luthier and his clients here and all are in a satisfying balance The Violin Maker is written for an interested general audience that has a modicum of knowledge about musical instruments although people with deeper knowledge are uite likely to enjoy it as we ll Marchese s descriptions are complete clear and presented without the author intruding on his story Curiously I have a feeling that I ve come to know the violin maker s work without getting to know the man but the feeling is not discomfiting Upon closing the cover at the end I felt as if I d finished a conversation with an intelligent and respected friend and I came away satisfied Recommended

  • Hardcover
  • 240
  • The Violin Maker: Finding a Centuries-Old Tradition in a Brooklyn Workshop
  • John Marchese
  • English
  • 12 January 2019
  • 9780060012670